News Release Details

10/23/2010

Desert Sky Gazers present “Clash of Constellations”

Story Photo
[Click Image to Enlarge] Please join the crowd at the EAC Discovery Park Campus at 6:30 p.m., on November 6, as that tradition continues with an invigorating outdoor presentation entitled, “Clash of the Constellations!” by Bob Hiatt, Vice President of the Desert SkyGazers Amateur Astronomy Club, and operator of the 20” Tinsley Telescope at the “Gov Aker” Observatory on the EAC Discovery Park Campus. Pictured: A diagram of the constellation Scorpio. [Submitted photo.]
 

By Lori Dugan

Thatcher, AZ—As long as 6,000 years ago, ancient cultures saw pictures in the night sky. Artifacts show that the ancients saw the lion, the bull, and the scorpion in the stars when, at the end of the day, they would gather together under the night sky to hear about and see the adventures (and occasional misadventures) of the gods.

Please join the crowd at the EAC Discovery Park Campus at 6:30 p.m., on November 6, as that tradition continues with an invigorating outdoor presentation entitled, “Clash of the Constellations!” by Bob Hiatt, Vice President of the Desert SkyGazers Amateur Astronomy Club, and operator of the 20” Tinsley Telescope at the “Gov Aker” Observatory on the EAC Discovery Park Campus.

“We’ll sit under the stars in an open-air forum as did the ancients, adjacent to our modern observatory. We’ll hear about and observe the hero Perseus in his attempts to save Princess Andromeda; we’ll observe Hercules, son of the mighty Jupiter; and we’ll see if Orion the mighty hunter will show up,” says Paul Anger, Discovery Park Campus director.

Bob Hiatt has been the vice president of the Desert Sky Gazers for the past two years and as a past presenter, he enjoys sharing astronomy. “Mythology is a really fun side of astronomy and Bob has always felt that it should be explored,” says Anger. “This will be an exciting opportunity for all of us to not only hear about these beautiful constellations, but also have them pointed out and explained first-hand in the night sky. While we will be outside as the ancients were, we’ll use green laser technology to aid in pointing out the constellations.”

Attendees are reminded to bring a coat, sweater or wrap as it gets a little chilly this time of year.

There will be door prizes, tours, space shuttle simulator rides, as well as star gazing from the observatory, all free of charge and minutes away from home. For more information, contact Paul Anger at (928) 428-6260.

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