News Release Details

10/5/2007

EAC’s Anthropology lecture series continues with Rock Art and Southwest Archaeoastronomy

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Eastern Arizona College’s Discover Anthropology lecture series continues Oct. 13 with a free slide show and lecture entitled Rock Art and Southwest Archaeoastronomy at 6:30 p.m., in the Jupiter Room on the College’s Discovery Park Campus.
 

By Lori Dugan

THATCHER, AZ—What is the “Sun Dagger?” How were ancient Anasazi peoples able to track the complicated 18.6-year lunar stand-still cycle? Where did the Chacoans report on the Super Nova that resulted in the Crab Nebula? Did the Anasazi record the passing of Halley’s comet in 1066 AD?

As part of Eastern Arizona College’s Discover Anthropology lecture series, Dean Harry Swanson will present a free slide show and lecture entitled Rock Art and Southwest Archaeoastronomy on October 13, beginning at 6:30 p.m., in the Jupiter Room on the College’s Discovery Park Campus.

This subject is delivered in response to requests made by participants of previous programs and will explore the expanding presumption that ancient Native American sky watchers tracked and recorded pivotal astronomical events in their constructions and rock art. Recent discoveries related to summer and winter solstice, super novas, and planet tracking will be briefly explored. This is a relatively new and rapidly-growing topic of interest in Southwest archaeology. Come share some of what is now believed to be true about the meticulous recording of celestial happenings by the ancient peoples of our Southwest.

“We had 31 people at the Petroglyphs and Pictographs lecture last month,” said Swanson. “Each time we hold a lecture, the number in attendance grows! There seems to be an insatiable thirst for this knowledge in the Gila Valley.”

The entire community is invited to attend the continuation of this comprehensive culture lecture series. For more information about the lecture series or about Discovery Park Campus, call 428-6260. ###